Nomads of Gor: Gor Book 4


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Rogue of Gor Gor Assassin of Gor Gor 5. Time Nomads. Magicians of Gor Gor Vagabonds of Gor Gor Tribesmen of Gor Gor Explorers of Gor Gor Captive of Gor Gor 7. Kajira of Gor Gor Norman, John - Gor 08 - Hunters of Gor. Norman, John - Gor 07 - Captive of Gor. Recommend Documents. Your name. Close Send. Remember me Forgot password? Our partners will collect data and use cookies for ad personalization and measurement.

Learn how we and our ad partner Google, collect and use data. The best part and best character of the book is Elizabeth Cardwell, which is the first real solid female character in the series. The relationship Tarl and Elizabeth slave name Vella build is very engrossing. Norman does a great job of making Vella the fantasy woman every man wants note I said Vella, not Elizabeth. Again as in the last book, we have the themes of mass warfare, aggressive competition, and epic struggles.

This book does a better job at those themes than the previous books and its very satisfying to see the evolution of the writing. One of the things that struck me about this book that was different than the first three was the comical dialog. Comical in some places obviously on purpose and to excellent effect, but comical in other places where you are left wondering if Norman intended to be funny or he's just not paying attention to what he's writing. Either way, its entertaining.

This book brings the BDSM element of the series to full effect. That theme is part of the first three books as well, but it was more matter of fact and a background element in previous books In this book the BDSM aspect begins to become part of the soul of the story rather than just a backdrop. A lot of that is done through the character Vella and her interaction with the Tuchuks and Tarl. When you read about a slave girl sleeping all night with her head in a dung sack, and in the morning it makes her a "good girl," you know it's getting serious and a little weird.

Personally I would have liked part of the series or an offshoot series to chronicle Vella's adventures on Gor. I finished. I really, truly finished. I'm not sure you understand how happy I am to be done reading this trainwreck of a novel. It took me three months, but I finished. Three months of shoddy writing and horrible characterization.

Three months of reading about men constantly pounding their chests and grunting about how manly and dominating they are. Three months reading about simpering women who love being helpless slaves to Big Strong Men. Honestly, though, it's a shame that Norman jumps the shar I finished. Honestly, though, it's a shame that Norman jumps the shark here, because if you strip the books of their stupid "slavery is good" undertones, and actually introduce decent writing, the main plot could be very, very good.

But it isn't, so I'm going to walk away from this series now before it has a chance to get worse.

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Dec 04, Paul rated it it was ok. I don't know why I keep reading these. The storytelling is not that good. At times it's too much detail that one is clearly not interested in.

Nomads of Gor

This book finally races past kinky and steps firmly into the realm of sadomasochism. Not really necessary. Tarl Cabot is a confusing character with shifty morals; most of the times I dislike him. The constant use of the deus ex machina device to tie the story together common with Edgar Rice Burroughs as well, I might add does not help.

However, towards I don't know why I keep reading these. However, towards the end, the storytelling gets tighter, I started becoming more interested in the characters and by then it's done. It makes me wonder if I'll bother with another volume. I enjoyed the end, so instead of giving it 1 star, I'll give it two. Oct 31, Charles rated it really liked it Shelves: fantasy. Well I liked it. There, I admitted it. Now apparently that makes me a bad person or something because the Gor novels are supposed to be ABOUT the misogynistic domination of women and gratuitous male-centered erotic tripe.

Except that it isn't - at least, not yet. I know the books are supposed to devolve into rubbish as the series progresses but as of this one 4 it's still a decent escapist read with some provoking questions about male-female relationships, will-to-power, and cultural relativi Well I liked it. I know the books are supposed to devolve into rubbish as the series progresses but as of this one 4 it's still a decent escapist read with some provoking questions about male-female relationships, will-to-power, and cultural relativism.

So far in the first 4 books of this series there has been almost no graphic description of sex or any sexual act. Nothing that isn't surpassed in modern teen-whatever-romance books. Yes, women on Gor are beaten and enslaved, but so far it is not described in a manner that glorifies the act of violence or even slavery. And just because Tarl doesn't haul off and start decapitating anyone who mistreats a woman doesn't mean he's a jerk.

I don't care if you are Rambo, if you suddenly appear in say Saudi Arabia, you don't make waves about womens rights and try to overthrow the whole burka thing. That being said, yes, obviously Tarl is biased and doesn't restrict himself from all the 'privileges' his new home planet provides him. The repression of women is not justified in its description.

1996 Spawn Series 4 (Cy-gor Original Purple) Video 4 of 8

Tarl, as Gor-ified as he becomes, still retains and struggles with drawing a line somewhere between Gor's brutality and Earth's naivete, while still trying to keep a place in between to fit his own ego he is the big hero of the planet after all. It's a flawed method as well: most people, men or women, put through such treatment would also become surprisingly servile. Now there are some problems to be sure.

The women are simplified, undeveloped psychologically most characters in the series are lacking a bit in proper motivation and "personality" - even here in "Nomads", which has the most characterization in the series yet. I was a bit disappointed that Elizabeth didn't turn out to be a really different sort of woman, one who didn't quite fall into the simple profile that Norman has been casually theorizing on.

Or at least offer more resistance to what Gor wants her to be. With all this talk about the domination of women and what a woman's roll is, I think the most interesting perspective that could emerge from Gor would be that of a woman-warrior, a Red Sonja type. But such a character would have to be a true outsider from Gor, like Tarl himself is. Elizabeth could have been that maybe not, I know she's just a dainty office secretary-type, but I feel that would have been a more interesting opportunity to explore.

I worry that Tarl's perspective might start to bore me in future tales, since he seems to be steadily apologetic of Gor's extremeness while each encounter only reinforces the Gorean outlook on life.


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As each woman in the series is conquered similarly I worry the series will get repetitive rather quickly - that in all likelihood is probably the biggest flaw of the Gor series. Because in all honesty people, fantasy as a fiction genre is a pretty male-centric field. Convention gives us the heroics of the dashing hero who rescues damsels from new dangers.

What Norman does is talk a bit more about the psychology of such male 'heroes': such a world where women are left so helpless to monsters and villains would also impose the right of the man to take all that he will. So complaining about the treatment and depiction of women in the series is like complaining the dinosaurs in Jurassic Park kill people.

Nomads of Gor is the funnest one in the series so far and I loved the new characters who liven things up.

Nomads Of Gor by Norman, John

The Tuchuks are funny, wily, annoying, lovable, interesting and barbaric all at once. I hope the series continues in this fashion, or at least continues to build on itself and its world. I normally prefer the original editions of books but unlike the first three in the series, I could not find an affordable copy of this one. Immediately the prose feels different from previous volumes; smoother, less arcane and far less fun. The heavy descriptions start coming at you and much information is given to the reader with statemen Originally posted at the Scorpion Bow Network on the Furiously Eclectic People site.

The heavy descriptions start coming at you and much information is given to the reader with statements like "I learned later that This is also the poorest editing of the series so far with many grammatical errors. Norman makes an astute observation that unlike on Gor, slavery on Earth is more subtle and invisible where people often disbelieve it.

Each twist is well explained before it happens so as to offer no surprises. It also becomes quite repetitive. At halfway through it feels like things may start moving but there really just isn't much going on. Being led so delicately through all the foreshadowing so nothing can be a surprise is disheartening. Two thirds of the way through and it becomes work to read. We learn about the Gorean freedom through slavery and how it compares to Earth.

True freedom is found in submitting to the right master. This is much the same in Earth philosophy. We all submit to a master, be it Yahweh, money, a person, or many other idols. A fair amount of time is spent on this and while it's very interesting, it's also not essential to the actual story. It is something some may roll their eyes and skip while others will find this part most intriguing.

We finally get to see some action and the climax of the story. The main thrust is complete and we're left with a question to be answered by reading another book. Nomads was often dreary, long, painstaking, and predictable. Once the story picked up, it was educational and entertaining. Spoilers Ahead, you have been warned!!! What a struggle! Buried in this book is a potentially excellent high-fantasy adventure. But it is well buried!

The bones of the story: Our "hero" Tarl Cabot finds himself sent to the Wagon peoples to rescue the last egg, and last hope, of the Priest-Kings.

Nomads of Gor (Gorean Saga, Book 4) - Special Edition

Finding his way to the Wagon peoples he befriends one, lives among them, learns their ways and culture. In the mean time the golden egg he is hunting for is stolen and the Ubar is killed. Tarl breaks into Spoilers Ahead, you have been warned!!! Tarl breaks into the city of the merchant who had the egg stolen and is captured. He is forced to fight a mysterious and deadly beast and escapes. His companion captures a slave and earns a place of honour among his people in the process. Eggless, Tarl disguises himself but is soon found out and whilst on the run discovers he has a friend in the city.


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He happens to be in hiding still when the Tuchuks attack and take the city. But the wagons are under attack and Tarl must take a tarn and find help from the other clans. He then heads to defend the wagons and when it looks like he must die in this fight he is rescued by the arrival of the other clans. Clans united, plans are made for the rescue of the egg. They break into the fortress of the merchant, scuffles ensue, plots are concluded. Tarl leaves the Wagon people with the egg and a free woman in toe. You see, one paragraph to explain the basic plot but it is wrapped in waffle!

Tarl explaining, repeating himself, reiterating, enslaving women, freeing women, enslaving them again and then freeing them as well as constant justifications for the Gorean slave tradition. I think if the author just embraced the whole slave concept and went, this is the world he's in like it or lump it, and then just wrote pure fantasy without all the justifications it would make the indecisive, hot and cold Tarl a lot more likeable.

Anyway, I started this series thinking I'd read my way through them all but if the next book doesn't improve and, in fairness, that's giving him five books to improve with I'll be giving up on it. Well I am glad I managed to finish the 4th book in the series and I'm on my way to finish them all one at the time. I am no expert, nor claim to be one, but this is a very good read in my humble opinion, despite the controversy surrounded by the overall idea of male domination over the female, about the slavery institution - that is more or less present in today's modern society even many don't want to admit it in open - and much more.

The reader, especially the one knowing how to read between the Well I am glad I managed to finish the 4th book in the series and I'm on my way to finish them all one at the time. The reader, especially the one knowing how to read between the lines will find much more than just the typical fantasy plot, with the good guy fighting the bad guys, the hero versus villains conflict, the good versus evil confrontation whit the well expected final when the hero wins, gets the beautiful girl and moves on with his life.

The more profound reader will enjoy to find an elaborate debate and dissertation about courage and the need not to worship material things or Gods, but to live free, enjoy simple things while doing the best to protect your lifestyle and you own kind. Also a very elaborate concept description and approach can be found about the liberty versus slavery and what it means in the end, for all of us, even now in the modern industrialized world worshiping the all mighty dollar and trying to please our mid and upper level managers, selling ourselves to them in a material world, being trapped in preconceived norms and rules of our civilization and forgetting the simple origins of life and basic survival.

Even though I passed well my college years, I am very tempted to go back to Queens, NY and to enroll maybe to the philosophy PhD program, just to learn more directly from John Norman himself, that I understand is still teaching there under his real name. Anyway, aside my humble opinions about this one, if you have the guts to face some deep philosophical themes, you will enjoy this book as well as all the others from the Gorean series. Have fun Apr 12, J.

Day rated it it was amazing. I have read the entire series, there simply isn't anything else like it; they are decadent and addictive, completely and wholly something everyone should have on their MUST READ list. At the same time, they are not written in a way as to be entirely sexual, he merely casts about components and subtle subt I have read the entire series, there simply isn't anything else like it; they are decadent and addictive, completely and wholly something everyone should have on their MUST READ list.

At the same time, they are not written in a way as to be entirely sexual, he merely casts about components and subtle subtext that one familiar with the lifestyle would of course pick up on, while a "vanilla" person could read right over without ever noticing or being offended. The worst part of this series is it's highly addictive quality. Definitely my favorite of the series so far.

I think my friend explained it best, this is basically like cowboys, but with cooler mounts! Considering I definitely have a thing for cowboys, it's no wonder this appealed to me. I'm reading the e-book, so I'm not sure if there are just a lot of spelling errors in this version, or if it's an overall thing for this book, but that was really the only thing I did not like about it.


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It became really distracting, and sometimes I wasn't sure if the spellin Definitely my favorite of the series so far. It became really distracting, and sometimes I wasn't sure if the spelling errors were intentional or not. But if you can look past them, I found this book much more exciting than the last one. It really makes me want to read the next one. Sep 21, David Teachout rated it really liked it Shelves: fantasy. The story itself is largely simple though the writing keeps getting better with each book, but it is fun and that sometimes is all that's needed.

Mar 30, William Norris rated it really liked it. Not quite as resplendent with painting the picture as the first three books in the series. I read the series when I was 19 and now I am rereading it a It's been a trip through time for me so far. It took me a little work to find the entire series as they have been out of print for some time. I had accompanied my wife to her used bookstore to carry the book in and out and I stumbled onto the first 3 books. I devoured them in a few days. Dec 15, AmbushPredator rated it it was amazing. Tarl Cabot comes to the land of the Mongol Hordes Errr, that is, the Land of the Wagon People.

His quest: to find and return the lost egg of Priest Kings. This is one of the most cinematic of all the novels, and also the one with the most engaging supporting characters, and the most humour, too. It introduces Elisabeth Cardwell, and seques neatly into the one novel I love above all of them - 'Assassin'. What I'd give to see that one on screen. Sep 03, Christopher Walls rated it really liked it Shelves: fantasy.

I read this whole series in a marathon session, while stationed in England. The depth and volume of the stories is humbling for any writer and I consider this series very influential in my own approach to writing and world building in general; generic post for all the books in this series as I am finally getting around to recording my reading list in Goodreads. May 15, DKC rated it really liked it Shelves: adult , adventure-fantasy.

Going through the Gor series for the first time, I find myself wondering if Norman occasionally got tired of his hero. But then, I think how Norman doesn't seem afraid of juxtaposing his hero against other characters that are more intelligent, or exciting, and I find it a bit refreshing. But that's why I struggled with this book at first.

Nomads of Gor: Gorean Saga, Book 4 (Unabridged)

There were so many times I wanted to smack Tarl's noggin in this installment of the series! Even with that, I thoroughly enjoyed most of the aspects of this bo Going through the Gor series for the first time, I find myself wondering if Norman occasionally got tired of his hero. Even with that, I thoroughly enjoyed most of the aspects of this book. Small list of high points below; I've hidden major spoilers, or at least, tried to. Harold - Call me nuts, but it's somehow endearing to have a lowly social outcast named "Harold.

Wily Tuchuk! I imagined the conversations between she and Tarl as Norman's fantasy arguments with some of the feminists of the day. I will say, view spoiler [I was quite shocked when Tarl internally considers rape as a means of ending the debate. So far in the series, I hadn't come across that word in all its blatant brutality. But I found it reassuring that he chose not to; it kept him from becoming something lesser, to my mind.

The whole concept and the descriptions made this terribly creepy and horrific, nay, almost Lovecraftian. Plot twists - Even though I thought I had it all figured out, Norman surprised me nonetheless. In the end, I still felt smarter than Tarl, and I think that's what accounted for my frustrations with the book. Overall, though, one of my favs in the series.

Jun 21, Farseer rated it liked it. Sword-and-sandal story in the pulp tradition of Edgar Rice Burroughs. Good worldbuilding. Barely adequate writing. This series is of course in famous for the weird BDSM-like slavery, and in this fourth book it starts playing more of a role, although it's still not the whole focus. In this fourth book we go back to pulp fantasy adventures after the science-fiction detour of the previous book. It's fine, but Norman is gradually spending more time with philosophical disquisitions and conversations Sword-and-sandal story in the pulp tradition of Edgar Rice Burroughs.

It's fine, but Norman is gradually spending more time with philosophical disquisitions and conversations about how women are only truly free and happy when they submit to a strong male master and all that. Extremely non-politically correct, of course, but my main problem with it is that those passages are so dull and long-winded. With this worldbuilding, there is a quite enjoyable story to be told here, with or without the BDSM themes, but Norman doesn't quite get there. He is just not that good of a writer and would seriously need to submit to a strong editor, male or otherwise, who would streamline his storytelling.

Jan 31, Aaron Bolin rated it liked it Shelves: fiction. I've now read four books into the Gorean Saga. After four books, I still don't know what I like about Gor. It is kind of like Konan the Barbarian met a year-old script writer. So, this is not fine literature. However, it is entertaining and somehow engaging. The endless action gives the book a nice pace, and the mindless plot is sort of relaxing because you won't have to think much to keep up. There is a bit of a turn toward the end of the book where John Norman goes off the rails and starts I've now read four books into the Gorean Saga.

There is a bit of a turn toward the end of the book where John Norman goes off the rails and starts preaching about the virtues of being enslaved otherwise, not a bad book. Apr 26, Allan Ashinoff rated it liked it. Of the four Norman Gor books I've read, this being 4th, this was least impressive to me. Overall, fair. Good read Excellent action-adventure A engrossing Tale in an exotic world Original story concepts and great character development A truly great story.

Great book Another well perhaps one of the best stories of GOR. Excellent series. Superb indeed. Years into the future these books will hold. Oct 08, Frank rated it liked it Shelves: adventure , science-fiction. Read this in the 70s along with several other Gor novels. Feb 16, Joel rated it liked it Shelves: sci-fi , fantasy , pulp. These books are difficult to rate and, honestly, pretty difficult to read. It's like it started as a something that exists and was accepted in the novels' world to a focal point and topic of philosophy that is promoted.

I saw someone's comment on Goodreads for an earlier novel in the series that this is like watching a slow-motion train-wreck t These books are difficult to rate and, honestly, pretty difficult to read. I saw someone's comment on Goodreads for an earlier novel in the series that this is like watching a slow-motion train-wreck that is hard to look away from. I will probably read another one. I guess I am a glutton for punishment. Sep 09, Christian West rated it liked it.

This series appears to have gone downhill quickly. Tarl super warrior and the world's most desirable man is now searching for the last remaining egg of the Priest-Kings giant golden ants in the realms of the wagon people warriors who have wagons After convincing the hostile wagon people that they should love him for his huge warrior attributes, he gets on with turning a poor earth girl into a slave, whilst causing every girl within sigh This series appears to have gone downhill quickly.

After convincing the hostile wagon people that they should love him for his huge warrior attributes, he gets on with turning a poor earth girl into a slave, whilst causing every girl within sight to swoon over him and throw their Gorean panties at him. He then proceeds to use his mighty warriorness to impress all his enemies and cause even more girls to throw away their clothes and declare their undying love for him. All of that I could deal with. What got me is that he ruminates on the local philosophy that all girls want to be slaves, decides he sort of believes it, and then "seduces" the earth girl into being his sex slave just after he considers raping her.

What the hell? I knew where this series was headed, but why would the character do such a on his beliefs in such a short amount of time? Book one doesn't count because he went back to earth in the meantime. Book three he was such under a mountain fighting giant golden ants, so really it's only book two and four where he's had a chance to be convinced that all woman desire to serve men.

It just doesn't ring true for me. The book still gets three stars because the first half is fine, and much of the second half is okay. But the parts where he seduces Elizabeth and she turns into his mindless sex slave Tarl has turned into a big big prat. Sep 23, Robert Jenkins rated it really liked it Shelves: gor. This book would have gotten 5 stars, except that the first pages were solely concerned with world-building relative to the Wagon People's of Gor and was very dull.

Nomads of Gor: Gor Book 4 Nomads of Gor: Gor Book 4
Nomads of Gor: Gor Book 4 Nomads of Gor: Gor Book 4
Nomads of Gor: Gor Book 4 Nomads of Gor: Gor Book 4
Nomads of Gor: Gor Book 4 Nomads of Gor: Gor Book 4
Nomads of Gor: Gor Book 4 Nomads of Gor: Gor Book 4
Nomads of Gor: Gor Book 4 Nomads of Gor: Gor Book 4

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